Videos

 

100 YEARS IN 100 SECONDS

  

The technological and logistical circumstances of the modern warfighter are nothing like those of warfighters who lived 100 years ago. Following World War I, Benedict Crowell believed in the need for a stronger defense base and greater industrial readiness for the United States of America in times of both peace and war. Given NDIA’s steadfast commitment to education and advancement within the defense industrial community, the American warfighter is better equipped than ever with an arsenal of technology and information to protect and defend our nation. For the next 100 years, NDIA will remain at the Heart of the Mission.

 

NDIA & SMALL BUSINESS

  

Not only is Mary Lockhart a retired Air Force officer, she is also the founder, president, and CEO of PEMDAS Technologies & Innovations—a woman-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned small business that builds environmental intelligence solutions for the DoD. Given that Ms. Lockhart recognizes the challenges of a small business doing work with the DoD, she understands the great value of a partnership between small business and NDIA. While “understanding the environment can be a force multiplier” in the military, NDIA is “the bridge” that enables small businesses like PEMDAS to navigate their work with industry and government. In the end, NDIA’s dedication to small business provides the American warfighter with the best technology possible and, thereby, the most effective means of defending our nation.

 

LAND DOMAIN

 

“The art of war is simple enough Find out where you enemy is. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on” – Ulysses S. Grant

 

Warfare has become increasingly complex over time, requiring more and more of American warfighters and their technology, machinery, and multi-domain capabilities. In working with the Army Futures Command and America’s ever-growing industrial base, NDIA ensures that the warfighters of today and tomorrow have a competitive advantage on the battlefield.

 

SEA DOMAIN

 

“A good navy is not a provocation to war. It is the surest guarantee of peace” – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Since the Industrial Revolution, technological advancements have transformed the operations and tactics involved in naval warfare. In the aftermath of World War II, a collaboration between government and industry developed nuclear-powered vessels for long-term submarine expeditions. As a result, today’s naval capabilities are strong enough to support the facilitation of special operations in the land, sea, and air domains. For decades, NDIA has driven the collaboration between industry and government, enabling U.S. naval forces to guarantee peace both at home and around the world.

 

AIR DOMAIN 

  

“The aeroplane will practically decide the war in Europe, for the old-time war tactics are no more” – Glenn Martin

 

Between World War I and II, innovation in aviation technology and operations rendered air a legitimate and threatening domain of warfare alongside that of land and sea. Though it was not until World War II that aircrafts took on the ultimate responsibility of deploying the most devastating ordnance—the atomic bomb—they have been vital in the security and defense of the nation since their invention. Today, NDIA works with industry and government to maintain the American warfighter’s competitive edge in the air through the development of innovative capabilities and technology.

 

SPACE DOMAIN

  

“Our leadership in science and in industry require us to make this effort, to solve these mysteries, and to become the world’s leading space-faring nation” – John F. Kennedy

 

While American warfighters’ control of the land, sea, and air domains is crucial to the security, their occupation of the ultimate high-ground of international warfare that is space provides great advantages in integrated, multi-domain operations. Space technology enables different branches of the military to deploy precision-guided munitions with enhanced command control. Given the key role of the space domain, NDIA works with government and industry to support American warfighters in their use of space to defend our nation.

 

CYBER DOMAIN

  

“Someday, on the corporate balance sheet, there will be an entry which reads, ‘information’ for in most cases, the information is more valuable than the hardware which processes it” – Grace Hopper

 

With its roots in government, the digital domain has long had a large impact on military operations. Since its inception, globalized internet has offered both possibilities and threats. While the cyber domain connects individuals, organizations, and machines, it also renders distance and geopolitical boundaries nearly irrelevant. For this reason, warfare in the cyber domain spans the spectrum of conflict and should, therefore, be taken as seriously as warfare in any of the other domains. In order to further ensure the national security and defense of our nation, NDIA convenes collaborative and educational events so that key policy- and decision-makers can navigate the ways in which the cyber domain is interconnected to all other domains of warfare.